Month: May 2012

IndyView Revisited: 13th & Delaware, Northwest

Photographer: Carol Titus; historic photo from IHPC You’ve probably passed it hundreds of times: 13th & Delaware. Just north of the President Benjamin Harrison Home. You may have noticed the proliferation of apartment buildings and businesses that populate the stretch of Delaware from 13th to 16th on Delaware Street. This one was built sometime after 1929 on the grounds that had been home to the John W. Schmidt family (they relocated here after living in the home we now know as The Propylaeum) and the Lynn B. Millikan Family sometime after...

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Indianapolis Then and Now: Christ Church Cathedral, 125 Monument Circle

Perhaps because June makes my mouth water for strawberry shortcake from the Christ Church Strawberry Festival, I’m focusing this week on Christ Church Cathedral. Tiffany recently wrote about the lesser known facts about Christ Church, so I’ll not get into the history but will let the photos speak for themselves. These images show how the church once towered over other houses and churches on the Circle, but today “the little church on the circle” is dwarfed by its neighbors. The Episcopal congregation built this Gothic Revival church (seen in the center of this ca. 1875 photograph) in 1857-59 and...

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Building Language: Adaptive Reuse

Kendall Inn at the former Fort Benjamin Harrison Adaptive Reuse. Our last preservation themed Building Language term for Preservation Month lets us examine adaptive reuse. Adaptive reuse is the ultimate building recycling – when a structure can no longer function in its original purpose, it will be modified or rehabilitated to accommodate a new use. Although adaptive reuse is not limited to historic buildings, the terms are often synonymous with major historic structure projects. Adaptive reuse provides an opportunity to save historic buildings, as a new use may permit the future viability of the structure. There are many adaptive...

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Sunday Prayers: Noble Flats

Have you seen this building? College Avenue just north of Michigan Street. Looks like it has seen better days, doesn’t it? Haven’t verified the exact date of this cool apartment building, but have found many adverts circa 1910, advertising “modern four room apartments” at The Noble. These evoke a bit of San Francisco in Indianapolis and it would be lovely to see these rehabilitated. If you were wondering where the name “Noble Flats” came from, wonder no more: College Avenue south of Mass Ave was formerly Noble Street. (Incidentally, north of Mass Ave before the thoroughfare became College Avenue,...

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Sunday Adverts: First Car to Win Indy 500, Marmon Wasp

From a 1913 advert for Marmon & Nordyke, the “Six-cylinder ‘Wasp,'” and winner of the first 500 Mile International Sweepstakes Race “against a field of 40 cars.” The local branch was listed at New York and Meridian Streets, noting “Sixty years of successful manufacturing.” Both Marmon and Nordyke lived on Delaware Street at one time–check out this article from the...

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Indianapolis Collected: The north-south battle over University Square

Before the days of Mapquest and GPS, travelers could usually tell if they were headed in the right direction by looking at the street signs. Lafayette Road led to Lafayette, Brookville Road to Brookville, and Zionsville Road to Zionsville, Granted, no one ever got to Georgia by walking down Georgia Street, but Market Street has always led to City Market and Senate Avenue still ends in front of the Senate chambers. But like any city of a certain age, Indianapolis has a number of streets that lead to places that no longer exist. For example, College Avenue lost its...

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Heritage Steward: Gwendolen Raley

NAME: Gwendolen Raley TITLE: Museum and Heritage Tourism Director FOR: Indiana Landmarks SINCE: January 2008 ORIGINALLY FROM: Bloomington, IN YOUR JOB DUTIES INCLUDE: 1) Directing operations at Morris-Butler House; 2) Directing Indianapolis Heritage Tourism initiatives including downtown walking tours, motorcoach tours, and special building tours such as the Indiana Landmarks Center, Morris-Butler House, and Catacombs tours at the Indianapolis City Market; and 3) Managing a corps of ~120 volunteers and docents who support these experiences. YOU WORK HOW MANY HOURS WEEKLY: ~50 PROJECT/S YOU ARE MOST PROUD TO HAVE BEEN PART OF: Currently, I am most proud to be...

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Friday Favorite: Indianapolis Athletic Club-What’s the Indy500 Connection?

It’s one of those arresting buildings that could trick you into thinking you live in NYC–well, if it were scrunched between 25 or so skyscrapers. On the southwest corner of Vermont and Meridian Streets, this early 1920’s building is a definite favorite. When completed in January 1924 (cornerstone placed in 1922), the building featured a host of amenities: grand ballroom, banquet rooms, dining areas, a pool, fitness center, basketball court, racquetball court, squash courts and a lounge. The club has provided brief shelter for US presidents, movie and music stars and other notables. The original purpose of the club...

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Indianapolis Then and Now: The Brookside Building, 2236 E. 10th Street

The Brookside Building was constructed by Foster Engineering Company at 2236 E. 10th Street (on the northwest corner of E. 10th and N. Beville Streets). The two-story, U-shaped brick structure was built using the Foster unit slab system of reinforced concrete and can be seen under construction in these 1925 and 1926 photographs at the Indiana Historical Society. The Brookside, presumably named for the nearby park, originally housed 14 apartments and 8 storefronts. Several pharmacies occupied the busy corner from the 1920s through the 1960s, including the Rossiter Cut Rate Pharmacy (as seen in this image) and later Ted Brown...

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Building Language: Facadism

Facadism. Our next preservation related Building Language term, in honor of Preservation Month, is facadism. The term facadism occurs when a construction project “saves” the historic façade (or front) of a structure, but demolishes the rest of the building. A new building is built behind the historic façade, allowing the developer to build a structure almost completely from scratch. The use of facadism is more common in large building projects, where the rehabilitation of the entire structure can be a larger undertaking. Two major building projects in Indianapolis have utilized facadism. The most recent one includes the Old St....

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Sunday Adverts: Treat and Warren

With all of Indianapolis aflutter in anticipation of the Indy 500, it gets me thinking about its earliest days and the early days of automobiles. With that in mind, check out a 1913 advert for one of the auto show rooms downtown. In looking for more background on Treat & Warren, found an article from Motor World, February 26, 1914 with Treat & Warren among exhibitors in an annual show for Automobile Trade Association. What early car maker would you like to have taken for a test...

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Seldom Seen Space: Sommers Mansion

Never heard a thing about this place until Janie White Hensley shared her story last week. I’d never heard of “Stewart Manor,” part of the campus of Tudor Hall School for Girls the last ten years it existed as an all-girls school. (1959-1969) Coincidentally, I learned of an IPS environmental magnate school property, “Sommers Mansion,” originally owned by the Charles B. Sommers Family. Turned out, the ‘Manor” and the “Mansion” are one and the same. The Sommers Home is near the Marian University Campus–not far from Riverdale, the former home of James A. Allison, most recognizable as one of...

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Friday Favorite: Cottage Home Historic Neighborhood

We love historic neighborhoods and we know many of you do, too. So, it’s always fun when one of our historic neighborhoods offers a home tour, giving you the chance to wish, dream, admire or imagine in an old setting that’s new to you. This weekend is the Cottage Home Neighborhood’s home tour. Info here. Fabulous community and neighborhood! Hope you can make...

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Heritage Steward: Rachael Heger

NAME: Rachael Adele Heger TITLE: Indiana Collection Supervisor  FOR: Indiana State Library SINCE? I’ve worked for ISL since 2007, and became supervisor in 2008. ORIGINALLY FROM? The north side of Indianapolis. YOUR JOB DUTIES INCLUDE? Collecting, preserving, promoting and making accessible materials related to the unique history and culture of Indiana. On a daily basis, that means I answer questions on a variety of topics, serve as a subject specialist in Indiana newspapers, work with other agencies and groups on projects, plan workshops, give tours of our gorgeous building, and anything else that comes my way. YOU WORK HOW...

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Indianapolis Then and Now: Fountain Square Substation #4 and Radio Radio

As Indianapolis expanded, it was necessary for the Indianapolis Police Department to grow and by 1912 four substations had been established. This charming cottage, located at 1117 Prospect Street in Fountain Square, housed Police Precinct Station No. 4. Two uniformed bicycle patrolmen pose on the front sidewalk. (Courtesy of Indiana Historical Society, Bass Photo Company #27561) According to a report prepared for the Indianapolis Chamber of Commerce in 1917, the four substations were leased to the city for about $1,000 per year. “Desk men” (possibly the man standing on the step?) were paid $3.25 per day to answer telephone...

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Learned something new? Question answered? New connection made? Generally inspired or entertained? Love Indy more?

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