Sunday Ads: Life (Insurance) In Indianapolis

Written by on April 24, 2016 in Sunday Ads - 1 Comment
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The Indianapolis Life Insurance Company was one of the largest Life Insurance providers in Indianapolis. (Courtesy Indiana State Library)

The Indianapolis Life Insurance Company was one of the largest Life Insurance providers in Indianapolis. (Courtesy Indiana State Library)

Name of Business: Indianapolis Life

Date of Advertisement: April 24, 1966

Neighborhood:  Midtown/ North Meridian Street

Service Provided: Life Insurance, Disability, Annuities

Years of Operation: 1905- 2009

Notable: The Indianapolis Life Insurance Company began figuring just how much you were worth in 1905. The business began in the Indianapolis Traction Terminal before moving to the Board of Trade Building around 1908. Both downtown landmarks have since been demolished. In 1929 they moved operations to their permanent locale at 2960 North Meridian Street. The business, started by brothers Charles, George and Joseph Raub, grew to be the third largest insurer in the state, with policyholders coast to coast. Indianapolis lost yet another homegrown brand name when the company merged with Aviva Life at the close of the last decade.

Additionally: Perhaps even more significant than the large insurer was its home office. The stately Meridian Street Mansion was home of Charles W. Fairbanks; he had lived just south of 16th and Meridian Streets prior to this home. Born in Ohio, Fairbanks served as a United States Senator and was Vice President under Teddy Roosevelt. After retiring from politics, he had this mansion built in 1912 and resided here until his death in 1918. Today, the home houses the International Medical Group.

Charles Fairbanks, Hoosier Senator and Vice President (Public Domain)

Charles Fairbanks, Hoosier Senator and Vice President (Public Domain)

The Fairbanks mansion still stands today on Meridian Street directly across from the Children's Museum.

The Fairbanks mansion still stands today on Meridian Street directly across from the Children’s Museum.

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About the Author

An avid runner who enjoys daily jaunts throughout Indy's historic neighborhoods, Jeff deeply appreciates the detail and workmanship of old architecture. So much so, that he lives downtown in a restored historic building. He also works downtown as a manager of a not-for-profit that promotes globalization throughout Central Indiana. In a past life, Jeff worked in the hospitality industry and may one day pen a book about the ridiculous things people do while staying in hotels. Stay tuned.

One Comment on "Sunday Ads: Life (Insurance) In Indianapolis"

  1. Bill Bussell April 24, 2016 at 9:47 pm · Reply

    I was thinking Indianapolis used to be life insurance city. There seemed to be life insurance companies everywhere. This company was a mutual company, meaning it was owned by those insured. A few years ago, a huge insurance company demutualized and bought out the insured mutual interest. So now we have all of these companies merging, and maybe unlocking wealth in the process. The show “60 Minutes” did a segment recently about the total lack of interest that companies have in identifying deceased customers. I had also read that one-third of all policies go uncollected. This is too big a subject for me to grasp at the moment, but it appears ripe for a look.

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