Sunday Ad’s: We’ve got you! Hook, Line and Sinker

Written by on October 2, 2016 in Sunday Ads - No comments
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This ad from December of 1925 shows the pharmacy had become more than a mere pill pusher offering the latest electrical gadgets.

This ad from December of 1925 shows the pharmacy had become more than a mere pill pusher offering the latest electrical gadgets. (Courtesy Indiana State Library)

Business:  Hook’s Drugs

Date of Ad:  July 29, 1906

Location:  Various Locations, Originally Prospect and East (demolished)

Years of Operation: 1900- 1994

Notable: What was once a household name across Indiana had humble roots. Started by a German immigrant by the name of John Hook, the first pharmacy opened at 1101 South East Street near Fountain Square. In 1950, the company opened their fiftieth store at the corner of Meridian and 38th Streets. By the mid-1980s, the Hoosier company dominated the pharmacy industry in Indianapolis and countless small towns in the area. A victim of a hostile takeover, the company was acquired by the Kroger company, but maintained their iconic green and white logo. That changed after being purchased by Revco in 1994. Three short years later Revco was purchased by CVS.

Additionally:  In 1966 attendees to the Indiana State Fair were treated to a new exhibit in the former Better Babies building. A turn-of-the-century Hook’s drugstore was recreated with counters, artifacts and a re-created Victorian-era soda fountain. The exhibit, originally intended to be temporary, proved so successful that it remained open daily for over thirty years! Sadly, the museum closed after an attempt to move downtown in the Wholesale District fell through. The partially restored building eventually became Kilroy’s bar serving up elixirs of a different sort. All is not lost– the exhibit still opens every year for the Indiana State Fair.

An early store at Washington and Penn. This building was demolished in the late 50s for a Roslyn Bakery. (Courtesy Bass Photo Company Collection. Indiana Historical Society)

An early store at Washington and Penn. This building was demolished in the late 50s for a Roslyn Bakery. (Courtesy Bass Photo Company Collection. Indiana Historical Society)

Hook's was a good community citizen and sponsored our local teams. Along with this pocket Pacer schedule, Hook's issued baseball cards for the Indianapolis Indians through the 1980's. (Courtesy eBay)

Hook’s was a good community citizen and sponsored our local teams. Along with this pocket Pacer schedule, Hook’s issued baseball cards for the Indianapolis Indians through the 1980’s. (Image: eBay)

An Almanac sponsored by Hook's from the 1920's.(Courtesy eBay)

An Almanac sponsored by Hook’s from the 1920’s.(Image: eBay)

This ad from 1966 invites nostalgia seekers to the Historic Hook's museum at the state fairgrounds

This ad from 1966 invites nostalgia seekers to the Historic Hook’s museum at the Indiana State Fairgrounds. (Courtesy Indiana State Library)

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About the Author

An avid runner who enjoys daily jaunts throughout Indy's historic neighborhoods, Jeff deeply appreciates the detail and workmanship of old architecture. So much so, that he lives downtown in a restored historic building. He also works downtown as a manager of a not-for-profit that promotes globalization throughout Central Indiana. In a past life, Jeff worked in the hospitality industry and may one day pen a book about the ridiculous things people do while staying in hotels. Stay tuned.

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