Sunday Prayers: Rivoli Theatre

Written by on June 16, 2013 in Sunday Prayers - 21 Comments
1 Flares Twitter 0 Facebook 0 Google+ 1 LinkedIn 0 Email -- 1 Flares ×
The Rivoli Theater, as seen in the late 1920s. The Rivoli, located at 3155 E. 10th St., was constructed in 1927. Here, the marquee advertises "The Terror," a 1928 "all-talking" film starring May McAvoy. (photo courtesy Bass Photo Co. Collection, Indiana Historical Society)

The Rivoli Theatre, as seen in the late 1920s. The Rivoli, located at 3155 E. 10th St., was constructed in 1927. Here, the marquee advertises “The Terror,” a 1928 “all-talking” film starring May McAvoy. (photo courtesy Bass Photo Co. Collection, Indiana Historical Society)

Downtown Indianapolis. Noon. At most tables, the lunchtime chatter was of clients, projects and “the kids.” But at our table—which was crowded with soup, a sandwich and notebooks—there was talk of an empty, dilapidated property. One on the Near Eastside, to be exact. The Rivoli Theatre, to be exacter.

Jim Kelly, president of the Rivoli Center for the Performing Arts, Inc., tilted back in his chair, his hands folded. “When was the last time you saw a movie?” he asked me.

I furrowed my eyebrows. “It’s been awhile, unfortunately.”

“Well, let me ask you this,” he said. “How would you describe the theater you last went into?”

“Dark,” I said with a laugh. “And that’s about it.”

“Oh, you couldn’t forget the Rivoli,” Kelly mused.

So I asked him about his favorite, about his most vivid memories of the Theatre. It takes only a moment for him to respond.

“The lights,” Kelly said, his eyes illuminating. “The lights would all be shining. You could see the Rivoli from the distance, all lit up and blinking. It was always fascinating. It was an entirely different world, especially inside.”

Kelly—who grew up in the area and who is the only board member to visit the Rivoli while it was still active—has fond memories of the Theatre. A quick browse through forums, articles, and the Rivoli’s Facebook page shows Kelly is not alone in his sentiments. In an email, former Eastsider Basil Berchekas, Jr. said he remembered how “majestic” the Rivoli’s overall appearance was. And, in an April 16 WFYI “The Art of the Matter” episode, co-host Sharon Gamble said that the Rivoli was “glorious.” Gamble, who is also the vice president for development at Indiana Landmarks, said in the episode that she and her friends used to attend the Rivoli on Friday and Saturday nights. “It was a beautiful space … elegant seats, cast-iron frames,” she said. “I remember beautiful upholstery, a huge screen, great detail, a domed ceiling with a beautiful motif around it and twinkling lights.” A glamorous movie palace, indeed.

(photo by Dawn Olsen)

(photo by Dawn Olsen)

(photo by Dawn Olsen)

(photo by Dawn Olsen)

The Rivoli, located at 3155 E. 10th St., was built in 1927. It was designed by architect Henry Ziegler Dietz in Spanish Mission Revival style, and included ornate iron brackets, second-floor faux balconies, parapet walls and a red clay tile roof (which was later replaced with red asphalt tiles). At the time, it cost $250,000 to build the Theatre, an amount that translates to a few million dollars today. According to the Rivoli’s website, “[Dietz] had an eye for beauty.” He included brick, Indiana limestone, leaded glass windows with upper window sashes, sweet gum woodworking and solid brass door fittings in the construction of the Theatre. Furthermore, the upper window sashes above the Theatre’s front doors were adorned with calligraphic “R”s.

The Rivoli was constructed under the belief that it would be “a new home of happiness for the entire family.” It was the first Universal Studios-owned theater in Indiana, and a positive correlation between luxury and theater attendees was established. (In other words, it was assumed that a more glamorous theater setting would attract more visitors.) The Rivoli was managed by Willis W. Grist, Jr., the local manager of Universal Chain Theatrical Enterprises, Inc. In an Indianapolis Star article published Sept. 15, 1927, Grist is quoted as saying, “The Rivoli will be for the entire family because of the moderate prices, the excellent pictures, unexcelled organ music, and because of courteous employees, general comfort, and assured safety.”

An article summarizing the construction of the Rivoli, its opening night and its dedication to being "a new home of happiness for the entire family" appeared in the Indianapolis Star on Sept. 15, 1927.

An article summarizing the construction of the Rivoli, its opening night and its dedication to being “a new home of happiness for the entire family” appeared in the Indianapolis Star on Sept. 15, 1927.

A noteworthy feature of the Rivoli’s Sept. 15, 1927 opening was the organ. The original organ was a Robert Morton “Golden Voiced” organ, so named for its “unusual clearness and sweetness of tone,” as quoted in an opening day article published in the Indianapolis Star. The opening night organist was a man named Tim Crawford, who played at numerous theaters, but elusively disappeared from Indianapolis after 1930. Though I am unsure of what happened to the original organ, I do know that, under the watchful eye of Rivoli manager Tom Ferree, a Louisville Uniphone Pipe Organ was installed in 1966. (That particular organ had originally been installed in 1927 in the Louisville Labor Temple. It was later rescued by Ferree from the United Hebrew Congregation Synagogue in Terre Haute, where it had been deemed “scrap metal.”) With talented organists and extraordinary acoustics, the Rivoli made for a fine theater experience.

A sideways shot of the Louisville Uniphone Pipe Organ, installed in the Rivoli in 1966. (photo courtesy Carlton Smith)

A sideways shot of the original Robert Morton organ. (photo courtesy Carlton Smith)

One of the two pipe chambers for the Louisville Uniphone Pipe Organ. The organ was featured in a Dec. 1966 theatre organ magazine. (courtesy Carlton Smith)

One of the two pipe chambers for the Louisville Uniphone Pipe Organ. The organ was featured in a Dec. 1966 theatre organ magazine. (courtesy Carlton Smith)

Though the Rivoli was originally designed and constructed as a single screen movie theater, it also provided the community with stage productions, and other live entertainment. In 1974, actress Gloria Swanson (best known for “Sunset Boulevard”) made a personal appearance on the Rivoli stage. Swanson’s 1929 silent film “Queen Kelly” was shown at the Rivoli, with organist Lee Erwin accompanying. Her nationwide tour included clips from her films. When describing her one-woman show, Swanson said, “I’ve tracked down about 25 films of mine from the silent days and I’ve edited them together, taking only the best or funniest or most interesting scenes from each.”

An advertisement for Gloria Swanson's appearance at the Rivoli Theatre appeared in the November 29, 1974 issue of the Indianapolis Star.

An advertisement for Gloria Swanson’s appearance at the Rivoli Theatre appeared in the Nov. 29, 1974 issue of the Indianapolis Star.

A preview for Gloria Swanson's visit to the Rivoli Theatre appeared in the Indianapolis Star on Nov. 29, 1974.

A preview for Gloria Swanson’s visit to the Rivoli Theatre appeared in the Indianapolis Star on Nov. 29, 1974.

Swanson wasn’t the only famous face to grace the Rivoli’s stage, however. In 1972, Ferree remodeled the stage to better accommodate live concerts. Bands such as Kansas, Lynyrd Skynyrd and Golden Earring appeared at the Rivoli. Kelly informed me that such concerts would cost only a few dollars, and that six dollars was an “outrageous” amount of money to spend on a concert. (He also said that, as a 10-year-old, he could purchase a movie ticket, a soda and some popcorn for forty-five cents.) It’s unsurprising that so many bands visited the Theatre; at the time of its construction, the Rivoli had the largest stage in Indianapolis. Each seat in the Rivoli offered an unobstructed view of the stage. There was an orchestra pit as well, and plenty of room backstage. Furthermore, the Rivoli accommodated 1,500 patrons (a population that, I should note, is larger than my hometown).

“With renovations, though,” Kelly said,” The number of available seats would go from 1,500 to about 1,000. We’ll need to widen the aisles, create handicapped seating, that sort of thing.”

I ask Kelly, who is also the co-chair of the renovation and construction committee, about the work that needs to be done in order for the Rivoli to be fully revived.

“Well, it’s a three to five-year plan,” he informs me. “And it’s going to cost about three to five million dollars for the entire project. Since the building is exposed, we knew we wanted to get a new roof first.” Originally, the board of directors had planned to re-roof the Rivoli in its entirety. However, when the bids rolled in, the board saw that the lowest one was still $174,000 over-budget.

“We had to redo our estimates,” Kelly said. Now, only the auditorium and stage part of the Rivoli will receive a new roof. New bids for the project were taken recently, and work is scheduled to begin later this month, on June 22.

“We’ve got a lot of work ahead,” said Kelly. “But with the economy coming back, we are staged—pun intended—to get the Theatre up and running.”

IA-0008-0007This circa 1970 photo shows the Rivoli in stable condition. The photograph is from the Indiana Album: NESCO History & Preservation Committee Collection.  NESCO advocates for the residents of the Near Eastside and, in the same year that Gloria Swanson visited the Rivoli, NESCO began “an intensive campaign of economic development and revitalization of businesses in the community.”

 The Rivoli formerly closed more than twenty years ago, in 1992. At the time, it was owned by Charles Chulchian, who had purchased the property in 1976. (Presently, Chulchian resides next to the Rivoli.) During Chulchian’s ownership, the Rivoli offered “skin flicks”—and a continuous run of them from 9 a.m. to midnight, seven days a week. A Jan. 29 Indianapolis Star article described a Rivoli advertisement as promising a “dirty-movie film festival.” In 2007, Chulchian gifted the Rivoli to the not-for-profit Rivoli Center for the Performing Arts, Inc. (Chulchian retained a legal interest in the property, however, which complicated restoration efforts in 2012, according to the Indianapolis Business Journal.)

Over the decades, the Rivoli has closed and re-opened several times. Universal Studios sold many of its smaller theaters in the 1930s, with the Rivoli going up for sale in 1937. Joseph Cantor purchased the Theatre, who used it to host motion pictures and live performances. Cantor then sold the Rivoli to Mr. and Mrs. Forest Kraning in 1952. The Kranings restored the marquee, redecorated the lobby, and added a new ticket office. It was under their ownership that the Louisville organ rescued by Ferree was installed. Ferree, as it were, would lease the Rivoli from the Kranings in the 1970s, before the ownership transferred to Chulchian.

A 1970s photo of the inside of the Rivoli Theatre, including a view of the organ and one of the organ chambers. (photo courtesy Carlton Smith)

A 1970s photo of the inside of the Rivoli Theatre, including a view of the organ and one of the organ chambers. (photo courtesy Carlton Smith)

The Rivoli Theatre stage in the 1970s. (photo courtesy Carlton Smith)

The Rivoli Theatre stage in the 1970s. (photo courtesy Carlton Smith)

A 1970s photo of the rear of the house. A Groucho Marx film reflects onto the west wall of the Theatre. (photo courtesy Carlton Smith)

A 1970s photo of the rear of the house. A Groucho Marx film reflects onto the west wall of the Theatre. (photo courtesy Carlton Smith)

Kelly told me that, for years and years, people in the Near Eastside had commented about the Rivoli, and had wanted to see it fixed up. Rejuvenated as an emblem of nostalgic theatre. With the help of Indiana Landmarks, preservation efforts began in 2003. One year later, the Rivoli was included on the National Register of Historic Places. Currently, renovation plans include sealing the roof, drying out the building, rehabbing the marquee, restoring decorative elements and rebuilding the acoustics. There are also a few apartments above the Rivoli, on the second floor. These apartments can be rehabbed as well, and could potentially provide homes for visiting artists. On the other hand, the roof could also be transformed into a green space, which could be rented out and used for parties, receptions, weddings and the like. Furthermore, there are four storefronts that need spruced up and revived. And though the marquee is original to the structure, the vertical “blade” was added later. And, in fact, the streetscape rendering done by the East 10th Street Civic Association and the Ball State University Design Center does not include the blade.

A rendering of historic facade restoration and addition of colorful streetscape elements (including an IndyGo bus stop and an inlaid brick paver crosswalk leading from the Rivoli entrance across 10th Street).

A rendering of historic facade restoration and addition of colorful streetscape elements, including an IndyGo bus stop and an inlaid brick paver crosswalk leading from the Rivoli entrance across 10th Street. (design created by the East 10th Street Design Charrette (2003), the East 10th Street Civic Association, and Ball State University Design Center)

A rendering of the historic marquee, which will be restored. Aluminum will be one of the main materials, and will be shaped to formed the word "Rivoli." (design created by the East 10th Street Civic Association and HAUS Architects)

A rendering of the historic marquee, which will be restored. Aluminum will be one of the main materials, and will be shaped to formed the word “Rivoli.” (design created by the East 10th Street Civic Association and HAUS Architects)

Of course, a restoration of this size (the Rivoli is 17,000 square feet) is going to cost quite a bit of money. There are a few stakeholders who have expressed interest in the Rivoli, but are hesitant to provide financial support until the theater is more stabilized. A Catch-22, have you. The Rivoli Center for the Performing Arts, Inc. does have one large fundraiser, however: the Rivoli Revue. The Revue is in its third year, and had grown, both in attendance and in money donated. In an email, Kelly added that it would be “great to team up with some established film festivals or historic theaters.”

(photo by Dawn Olsen)

(photo by Dawn Olsen)

(photo by Dawn Olsen)

(photo by Dawn Olsen)

(photo by Dawn Olsen)

(photo by Dawn Olsen)

It’s going to take some time—a few years, by the board’s estimate—for the Rivoli to be fully finished. However, the large-scale project coincides with the overall rejuvenation on 10th Street, and the board is determined to enhance that particular corridor. “Currently, there isn’t a lot of entertainment on 10th Street,” Kelly said in “The Art of the Matter.” “We want [the Rivoli] to be the place to come.” He later told me that he looks forward to being in his nineties and attending performances by individuals who have yet to be born or discovered.

“I didn’t want people to say, ‘Do you remember where the Rivoli was?’ Now, it’ll be ‘Do you remember where the Rivoli is?’”

If you’d like to learn more about the Rivoli Theatre, or would like to contribute, head over to the Rivoli website. You can stay in touch and learn about the most recent renovations through Facebook and Twitter. Also, if you are interested in seeing the (heartbreaking) inside of the property, I recommend watching “The Art of the Matter.” Sharon Gamble narrates the feature, which is at the beginning of the episode and lasts about 10 minutes.

Lastly, thank you to anyone and everyone who made this article possible, and who tolerated me through a lunch date, a phone call or a series of emails. (Or all three.)

1 Flares Twitter 0 Facebook 0 Google+ 1 LinkedIn 0 Email -- 1 Flares ×

Valuing = Supporting

Publishing HI every day is more than just a ’labor of love‘ (though we do love it), but takes hundreds of hours each month to create. If you are entertained, inspired, better informed, feel more connected with Indy or just value what you discover here, please consider becoming a supporting member with a recurring monthly donation.

Or, become a one-time supporter with a single donation in any amount you choose.

More old-fashioned? Checks or money orders may be sent to:
Historicindianapolis.com at P.O. Box 2999, Indianapolis, IN 46206

Thank you and HI-5! Love, The HI Team

About the Author

Dawn Olsen is a Midwestern nomad addicted to ChapStick, parallel sentences, books, and old buildings. She was born in Iowa and grew up in the Omaha-Council Bluffs metro area. After graduating from Purdue University, she took a job as an editorial assistant for the Indiana General Assembly and sub sequently transplanted herself to Indianapolis. She lives in the Holy Rosary district in an old brick building with a 90-foot smokestack. She shares creative non-fiction and photos on her blog, Candidly Clyde.

21 Comments on "Sunday Prayers: Rivoli Theatre"

  1. Michael June 16, 2013 at 9:31 am · Reply

    Another excellent, well researched article! My Dad grew up on Rural Street and he used to go to the Rivoli while in high school in the early 30’s. My brother and I went there in the 70’s when they were showing old Marx Brother films in all their black and white big screen glory!

    • Dawn Olsen June 18, 2013 at 8:02 am · Reply

      Thanks for sharing your memories, Michael! One of my coworkers said that, when she was in college, the Rivoli was the place to go if you wanted to see old movies.

  2. Jim Kelly June 16, 2013 at 9:56 am · Reply

    Great article. Thanks so much. Let me know if you need anything.

    • Dawn Olsen June 18, 2013 at 7:58 am · Reply

      Thank you, Jim. And thank you for agreeing to meet up, and for making time to talk about the Rivoli! I’d like to stay in touch as the renovations are being done.

  3. Bob Hueber June 16, 2013 at 11:18 am · Reply

    Best memory of the theater was in 1957. Went to see “The Curse of Frankenstein” and that movie scared the livin’ crap outta me. Had to fall asleep on the couch for days, because I didn’t want to go to bed in the dark bedroom.

    • Dawn Olsen June 18, 2013 at 8:02 am · Reply

      Thanks for sharing such a great memory related to the Rivoli! I’ve personally never seen “The Curse of Frankenstein” (though have seen several other older horror movies). In 8th grade, we had to watch “The Shining” (both the old and new versions), and–12 years later–I still wonder if there is some creepy lady lurking in the bathtub behind the shower curtain, waiting to scare the life out of me.

  4. basil berchekas jr June 16, 2013 at 12:17 pm · Reply

    Dawn, all I can say is that this article is EXCELLENT! I’ll be “up there” this weekend and at least plan to drive by there on 10th, and to see how East 10th is “doing”. Also plan to drive by on Emerson south of 21st to go past the house I and my sister “Peggy Berchekas Clark” (her name on facebook) grew up in, next to Brookside Creek.

    • Dawn Olsen June 18, 2013 at 8:06 am · Reply

      Thank you, Basil! I’m glad you are able to visit your hometown. I don’t know when you were up here last, but there has been a lot of work on 10th Street the last few years. The Super Bowl legacy has aided that, of course. It’s still patchy, but you can definitely tell which corridors the focus has been on.

  5. Carlton Smith June 17, 2013 at 9:54 am · Reply

    GREAT article Dawn!

    There are a couple of corrections though which you need to be aware of. First the photo that is labeled as ” A sideways shot of the Louisville Uniphone Pipe Organ, installed in the Rivoli in 1966″. Is in fact not of the Louisville console. That photo is of the origional 1927 Robert Morton console. Secondly in the article you mention that Tom Ferre owned the Rivoli. That information is incorrect Tom leased the theatre from Forrest Cranning. He never owned it.

    Thanks again for a wonderful article!

    • Dawn Olsen June 18, 2013 at 8:14 am · Reply

      The photos you sent were fantastic; I don’t doubt you’ve many more! Thanks for bringing a few corrections to my attention, and thank you for reading. I enjoyed talking to you and learning more about the organs that were once in the Rivoli. Will you be helping to install or maintain the new pipe organ for the Rivoli?

  6. Jason Scott Smith June 17, 2013 at 8:13 pm · Reply

    I’ve seen inside. Its unsalvageable.

    • Dawn Olsen June 18, 2013 at 8:19 am · Reply

      The inside is pretty devastating; some of the Indy Star articles include photo galleries of the Rivoli. WYFI’s “The Art of the Matter” episode is just heartbreaking. It’s so … decayed. When you say, “it’s unsalvageable,” do you mean the inside of the building, or the entire Rivoli? It is pretty dilapidated; no one will argue. The total cost of all the renovations is expected to be between $3 and $5 million. If the Rivoli were to be built entirely from scratch, it would cost about the same, if not a bit more. Isn’t that saddening? That the building is so far gone that the cost to renovate it is nearly the same as the cost to build an entirely new theater from the ground up. As someone on Facebook said, it “boggles me how [bad] something like that becomes in only a decade of being closed that it needs another decade to restore.”

      • Jason Scott Smith June 18, 2013 at 3:19 pm · Reply

        As far the the “whole” Rivoli, I can only assume you’re talking about the structure–walls, support beams and all. Being that, in my opinion, there’s nothing even attractive about the exterior and the inside is probably a biohazard from at the very least mold and bird excrement, I support demolishing it to rid the neighborhood of an eyesore (again my opinion) and divert those millions of dollars to something more substantial such as abandoned Methodist church in Gary. http://historicindianapolis.com/room-with-a-view-christmas-surprise/

        • Tiffany Benedict Berkson June 18, 2013 at 6:35 pm · Reply

          It’s not so simple as taking funds that would refurbish the Rivoli here in Indianapolis and instead fund rehabbing an abandoned church in Gary.

          Bill Cook spoke about his willingness to invest in West Baden Springs Hotel and the now Indiana Landmarks Center–the thrust being that there had to be a plan for use. It’s not just ‘save a building for the sake of saving a building.’ There needs to be a use–and an historic theatre within a community could potentially have just that kind of potential.

      • David Brewer June 18, 2013 at 6:30 pm · Reply

        Unfortunately, once the roof starts to go it doesn’t take long for a building to deteriorate. I was in Sedalia, Missouri back in the early 1990s and took some photos of a really beautiful victorian business block. It had been kept in fine shape over the years and was still being used as office space. Last year I found an article online about the town’s efforts to save the building. It was hard to believe it was the same structure. Same old story–the roof had sustained damage after a fire and never was repaired. As I’ve mentioned in one of the other threads, I have a wonderful childhood memory (early 1970s) of my father taking me to the Rivoli one night to hear the pipe organ. He had heard them in movie theaters as a kid in Kansas City and wanted me to experience it. He knew they wouldn’t be around forever.

  7. Tobie Smith Kniess August 9, 2013 at 9:03 pm · Reply

    Is there any news of the planned roof restoration ? The Facebook page and Rivoli web-site remain silent regarding this. Members were not allowed to vote in the May election of officers, and the Board meetings are now closed to the public.

  8. Jim Kelly August 10, 2013 at 9:02 am · Reply

    Ms. Smith, as board President of The Rivoli Center for the Performing Arts, Inc. I would like to answer your questions. The Rivoli is still in the planning stages of a roof restoration. We have acquired funding and are making up for a shortfall with the budgeted amount. We will announce the start of roof construction when we have a date specific.

    As far as elections. The bylaws for our group allows for general membership to vote for board members only. The board members then will vote for the officers. i.e. Pres., Vice Pres., Treasure, and Secretary.

    The board meeting are closed to the public, to allow a frank and open exchange of ideas between board members. Some items are sensitive to the future of the Rivoli and we need to control this information. This is standard procedure for many boards. We have a public session after each board meeting to update attendees.

    We welcome anyone to come, listen, volunteer, and join as a member.
    Thanks for your interest and look forward to seeing you at our public session of our board meetings.

    We are so close to getting things started.
    Jim Kelly, Board Pres. The Rivoli Center for the Performing Arts, Inc.

  9. Tobie Smith Kniess September 18, 2013 at 8:50 pm · Reply

    Jim, you clearly stated at the May meeting of members that the Board had voted at the April closed session to temporarily suspend members’ rights to vote. Our Bylaws( as Amended by Consent on Jan. 7 2009) allow members to vote at the annual meeting of members ( to be held in May of each year) for directors, AND, on ” all questions relative to the Amendment of the By-Laws.” As I have brought to the Board’s attention on more than one occasion, the language is ambiguous regarding whether or not members can vote for officers. Clearly, the By-Laws require that a written notice of each May meeting of members be sent to the members ” not more than 20 nor less than 10 days prior to the meeting”. ( Article 5 Section 1). As a member for three ( 3) consecutive years, I can assure you that no such written notice has ever been provided. I firmly believe that Rivoli members have a right to know how, and why, their voting rights have been suspended, and,, more importantly, when they will be restored.
    Tobie Kniess
    Rivoli Volunteer since August 2008, member since 2011, former Board member and former Board Secretary, Rivoli Center for the Performing Arts, Inc.

  10. Tobie Smith Kniess October 28, 2013 at 5:52 pm · Reply

    Mr Kelly told me the ambiguous language in the organization’s By-Laws was the impetus for the Board’s decision to suspend members’ voting rights before the May meeting. As someone who absolutely adores the precious old building, I hope this gets resolved before next year’s meeting. If there is any news regarding a ROOF for the Rivoli, I would love to hear that, too.

  11. Detrie Franks March 4, 2015 at 8:07 pm · Reply

    A memory is of seeing the movie “Xanadu” in the late 70’s. Does this make sense? Many fond memories of growing up on the Eastside.

  12. Bill Bussell November 14, 2015 at 9:37 am · Reply

    I practiced on the organ by entering through the building owner’s apartment and walking down the dark stairs into a very dark theatre. It was creepy in that nearly dark auditorium, until I brought the organ to life. I am so surprised at the degradation. It is remarkable that it was not demolished. Indianapolis lost more valuable theatres such as Loews. I think the Granada in Fountain Square would be an easier rebuild than the Rivoli. The Granada had a high scenery fly area still visible from the street. I would not be surprised if old stage backdrop scenery was not hanging in that fly area. My snapshot web site contains an album of the lost Clermont Deluxe, where my wife and I visited often with our two children. https://www.flickr.com/photos/35613416@N07/

Leave a Comment