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Reader’s Question:

I played several different sports at Tabernacle Presbyterian Church back in the 1950s.  I remember hearing that Tab’s recreation program was one of the oldest and largest church-sponsored athletic departments in the country.  Can you provide a little history?  ~ Becky in Florida

HI’s Answer: 

Tabernacle Presbyterian Church’s Recreation Ministry can be traced back to the 1920s, soon after the church relocated to its present site at 418 East 34th Street.  Prior to that time, the congregation had been located at 1101 North Meridian Street for more than thirty years.

Founded in 1851 as Third Presbyterian Church, the congregation first worshipped in Temperance Hall on the north side of Washington Street between Meridian and Illinois Streets.  In 1854, Third Presbyterian purchased land on the northeast corner of Ohio and Illinois Streets, where it erected the first of its own buildings.

The 1855 Indianapolis City Directory lists Third Presbyterian Church at the corner of Illinois and Ohio Streets (scan courtesy of IUPUI Digital Archives)

The 1855 Indianapolis City Directory lists Third Presbyterian Church at the corner of Illinois and Ohio ( IUPUI Digital Archives)

In 1884, Third Presbyterian sold its building at Ohio and Illinois Streets and began construction of a new church.  Before moving to the northeast corner of 11th and Meridian Streets in 1886, the congregation changed its name from Third Presbyterian Church to Tabernacle Presbyterian Church.  The church has been known as Tabernacle Presbyterian Church for nearly 130 of its 163 years.

From 1883 to 1923, Tabernacle Presbyterian Church was located on the northeast corner of 11th and Meridian Streets (postcard image courtesy of CardCow.com)

From 1883 to 1923, Tabernacle Presbyterian Church was located on the northeast corner of 11th and Meridian Streets           (CardCow.com)

By the late Nineteen-Teens, Indianapolis’ residents began moving away from the core of the city to escape the noise and grime of living downtown.  The construction of several wide bridges over Fall Creek enabled families to live a few miles out from the center of town but still be within a reasonable traveling distance to and from work.  New homes were built, and commercial nodes began popping up every few blocks in areas that would later be called the Mapleton-Fall Creek , Butler-Tarkington, and Meridian-Kessler neighborhoods.

In 1918, Dr. J. Ambrose Dunkel (1871-1944) became Tabernacle Presbyterian Church’s new minister.  Dr. Dunkel felt the operation of Sunday Schools was one of the most important functions of a church.  In his ministry, he spent a great deal of his time calling on people in the growing neighborhoods north of the church.  There he found many children playing in the streets.  Realizing there was no Sunday School in the newly established areas north of Fall Creek, Dunkel prevailed upon Tabernacle’s leaders to find a rental property in which they could start a Sunday School.  Finding nothing suitable to rent, the church then purchased land on the northwest corner of East 34th Street and Central Avenue.  A one-story frame and stucco chapel that resembled a residence was constructed on the western portion of the 302-foot by 185-foot lot.

In 1919, a frame and stucco building was erected to house Tab's Sunday School program (W. H. Bass Company Photo, courtesy of the Indiana Historical Society)

In 1919, a frame and stucco building was erected near 34th and New Jersey Streets to house Tabernacle’s new Sunday School     (W. H. Bass Photo Company Collection, courtesy of the Indiana Historical Society)

The Sunday School began operation in October of 1919.  This outpost of Tabernacle Presbyterian Church was originally conceived of as a form of community outreach.  Initially, the congregation had no thoughts of leaving its building at 1101 North Meridian Street.  However, by June of 1920, there were 500 children enrolled in the Sunday School, and by fall of the same year, there were over a 1,000!  The work of the church grew so rapidly at the new Sunday School location that Tabernacle’s members decided they should relocate all of the church’s activities and services there.  Soon plans were underway to build a magnificent new church.  It would be constructed in stages, beginning with the sanctuary on the east side of the lot.

The new church was designed by second-generation Indianapolis architect, Robert Frost Daggett Sr. (1875-1955), and Cleveland, Ohio, architect, John William Cresswell Corbusier (1878-1928).  Unfortunately, Corbusier did not live to see the completion of the entire structure.  The Bedford stone edifice is a wonderful example of Gothic Revival architecture, based on the methods and styles of building that flourished during the Medieval period.  The interior of the new building had all of the latest amenities and conveniences available at the time.  The Strathman Construction Company erected the building.

The first of three sections of Tabernacle Presbyterian Church was completed in January of 1923 (W. H. Bass Company Collection, courtesy of the Indiana Historical Society)

The first of three wings of Tabernacle Presbyterian Church was completed in January 1923         (W. H. Bass Photo Company Collection, courtesy of the Indiana Historical Society)

Ground was broken for the free-standing sanctuary in September of 1921.  Sixteen months later, the first phase of the new church was dedicated in a week-long celebration at the end of January and beginning of February, 1923.

The February 5, 1923, edition of The Indianapolis Star reported on the dedication of Tabernacle's new building (scan courtesy of NewspaperArchive.com)

The February 5, 1923, edition of The Indianapolis Star reported on the dedication of Tabernacle’s new building   CLICK TO ENLARGE

It was in the years just after the sanctuary portion of the building was completed that the seeds were planted for what became Tabernacle’s Recreation Ministry.  With about 2,000 young people attending the Sunday School in the structure to the west, and many families joining the beautiful new church, there was also an interest in recreational activities.  Soon, basketball and baseball teams were organized by Tabernacle members.

1923 postcard of Tabernacle Presbyterian Church's new sanctuary, with the Sunday School building to the west of it (image courtesy of CardCow.com)

1923 postcard of Tabernacle Presbyterian Church’s new sanctuary, with the Sunday School building still standing to the west of it           (CardCow.com)

Meanwhile, construction began on the two remaining sections of the building, one of which included a gymnasium, restrooms, and showers.  The building was completed in October of 1929.  In that same year, Tabernacle member John Dwight Peterson (1897-1990) assumed the responsibility of officially establishing the Recreation Ministry.

The October 4, 1929 edition of The Indianapolis Star described dedication of the recreation wing (scan courtesy of the Indianapolis Public Library)

The October 4, 1929, edition of The Indianapolis Star described the dedication of Tab’s new education and recreation wing                          CLICK TO ENLARGE

The October 5, 1929, edition of The Indianapolis News discussed the dedication of the new additions (scan courtesy of the Indianapolis Public Library)

The October 5, 1929, edition of The Indianapolis News discussed the dedication of the new additions              CLICK TO ENLARGE

 

1930 photo shows Tabernacle Presbyterian Church after the two new sections were completed (W. H. Bass Company Collection, courtesy of the Indiana Historical Society)

1930 photo shows Tabernacle Presbyterian Church after new wings were completed west of the sanctuary    (W. H. Bass Photo Company Collection, courtesy of the Indiana Historical Society)

In the early years of the recreation program, Tab’s athletic teams were comprised of church-sponsored players and played other churches’ teams.  Sometime in the 1940s, however, the activities were opened up to all young people who wanted to play sports, regardless of their religious affiliations.   Tab Rec also began to add athletic activities for girls in the summer of 1948, with the formation of girls’ softball teams.

(image courtesy of Tabernacle Presbyterian Church Recreation Department)

1930s basketball team         (image: Tabernacle Presbyterian Church Recreation Ministry)

As the recreation program grew, there was a need for more land on which outdoor athletic activities could be played.  The 1.3 acres originally purchased by Tabernacle Presbyterian Church for the Sunday School chapel was completely covered by the building after all three sections of the new church were built.

At a congregational meeting on July 21, 1941, authorization was given to Tab’s Trustees to purchase the 1.2-acre tract of land directly west of the church.  That purchase was completed late in 1941 or early in 1942, and that parcel of unimproved land became the athletic field.  It was named Evans Field in honor of Mr. and Mrs. Edgar Hanks Evans, who were major contributors of the funds for its purchase.  Several generations of the extended Evans family  (surnames of Evans, Harrell, and Stout)  owned and operated the Acme-Evans Company, which manufactured E-Z-Bake Flour.  You can read about the Acme-Evans Company in a Historic Indianapolis “Sunday Adverts” article here.

1941 Baist Atlas map shows the church and surrounding homes and businesses (map courtesy of IUPUI Digital Archives)

1941 Baist map shows the church completely filling the original lot and the vacant lot to the west that became the ball fields (map courtesy of IUPUI Digital Archives)                      CLICK TO ENLARGE

In 1942, Tabernacle Presbyterian Church acquired the land to the west of the church (photo courtesy of Tabernacle Recreation Ministry)

In 1942, Tabernacle Presbyterian Church acquired the land west of the church, which was cleared and became the ball fields    (photo: Tabernacle Recreation Ministry)

For many years, Tab was one of the few places in the city that grade school and high school age girls could play sports.   It’s hard to imagine now, but athletic programs for girls did not exist in the public or parochial schools until the final decades of the Twentieth Century.

A 1959 Girls Softball team included the author of this article (photo courtesy of Tabernacle Presbyterian Church)

A 1959 Girls Softball team included the author of this HI Mailbag article    (photo: Tabernacle Presbyterian Church)

1957 boys football team (photo courtesy of Tabernacle Recreation)

1957 Tab football team                (photo: Tabernacle Recreation)                    CLICK TO ENLARGE

In the 1960s, many of the urban neighborhoods that had been established prior to 1930 began to deteriorate, and there was a great exodus of families to the suburbs.  Tabernacle Presbyterian Church made the decision to remain in the neighborhood, while many other churches moved out.  In conjunction with its commitment to stay in the area, Tabernacle instituted a soup kitchen, food pantry, and tutoring program, in addition to its already existing mission projects.  For the past several years, the senior pastor has been Reverend L. John Gable.  The associate pastor is Oscar Clavel.

(image courtesy of Tabernacle Presbyterian Church Recreation Ministry)

1960s tAB football team                 (image: Tabernacle Presbyterian Church Recreation Ministry)

Today, Tab Recreation is an inner-city youth program that offers children ages 5-15 an opportunity to play sports.  The emphasis is on the importance of faith and fitness.  Hundreds of youths pass through the program every year.  Tab Recreation has developmental competitive leagues in football (both flag and tackle), basketball, soccer, track, cheerleading/dance, chess, and wrestling.
1969 Tab girls softball teacm (photo courtesy of Karen Earl)

1969 Tab girls softball team                              (photo from the collection of Karen Earl)

Over the 90 years since a recreation ministry was first established, there have been ten Recreation Directors.  In chronological order, the past directors were James B. Martin,  LeRoy Allen,  Ralph W. Smith,  Tom Wadsworth,  Frank Hamilton,  Guy Tex,  Marion Max Allen,  Russell W. Earl,  and John Byers. The person who held the position the longest was the much-loved Russ Earl (1925-1993), who was recreation director from 1951 to 1985.  The current Recreation Director is Ben Hughes.

Russ Earl was the Recreation Director at Tabernacle Presbyterian Church from 1951 to 1985 (photo courtesy of Karen Earl)

Russ Earl was the Recreation Director at Tabernacle Presbyterian Church from 1951 to 1985  (photo courtesy of Karen Earl)

Tabernacle Presbyterian Church’s Recreation Ministry will host a 90th Anniversary Celebration on Saturday, September 13, 2014, from 11 a.m. until 2 p.m.  Anyone who played, coached, refereed, or just stopped by to watch a game is invited to attend.  The church is also seeking photos of Tab Rec activities from years gone by, which you are encouraged to e-mail to dave.streit@tabpres.org.

Notable alumni of Tab Recreation include former Governor and Purdue University President Mitch Daniels,  Indianapolis Mayor Greg Ballard,  former New England Patriots Linebacker Rosevelt Colvin III,  Miami Dolphins Pro-Bowler Mark Clayton,  IUPUI Basketball Coach Jason Gardner,  Indianapolis Star Columnist Will Higgins, IBJ and The National Bank of Indianapolis Chairman Mickey Maurer, former New York Giants and Cleveland Browns Running Back Randy Minniear,  Attorney Marvin Mitchell,  Gallaudet College Physical Education Department Chair Kathryn Baldridge,  Indiana State Representative Greg Porter,  Chicago Bears Scout Sam Summerville,  retired United States Judge Anthony J. Metz III,  retired Principal of North Central High School C. E. Quandt,  retired law school professor Lynn A. McDowell,  Indiana Pacers Guard George Hill,  and many, many more fine citizens of the world.

 

10 responses to “HI Mailbag: Tab Recreation”

  1. Rick Patton says:

    My son and I participated for many seasons at TAB. One of the inner city’s best kept secrets. Thanks for getting the word out to those who are not aware of the great services provided to not only the youth of their congregation but also the surrounding community. Rick Patton, 1508 Broadway

  2. Janie Hensley says:

    Tab is my home church. Not only is their recreation ministry fantastic, but the building itself has some of the most fantastic stained-glass windows.

  3. Tim Jensen says:

    Sharon, I love your posts and greatly enjoy reading the Mailbag. One note on the architectural style of Tab. Wouldn’t it best be described as Gothic Revival? It is a wonderful example of the Gothic Revival style used in the 1920s (other examples would be Meridian Heights Presbyterian, Scottish Rite, Butler’s Fairview campus, etc.). Though there is no exact ending date for the original Gothic movement, most major Gothic buildings Europe were finished (or in the process of being completed) by the mid to late 1500s. Thanks again for all of your work!

  4. Sharon Butsch Freeland says:

    Thank you for the kind words about the HI Mailbag. I’m glad you enjoy reading the column. Your point about Tab’s architectural style is well-taken. Since Gothic architecture originated in Medieval Europe and was followed by other architectural periods, its appearance several centuries later and on another continent would more accurately be called Gothic Revival. I referred to its style as Gothic, because that’s the term I repeatedly found in my research for the article. It didn’t occur to me to question the accuracy of the description. Tab’s building was called Gothic in numerous references, so I merely parroted those sources. I will add the word “Revival” to the article. Thanks for helping to better educate me.

  5. Sharon Butsch Freeland says:

    Thank you for sharing your thoughts. Tab’s commitment to the neighborhood has clearly made a difference in many people’s lives.

  6. Esther Shir says:

    Wonderful article, Sharon. Loved seeing the older churches too!
    Softball at Tab!!!

  7. Sharon Butsch Freeland says:

    Thanks, Esther. Do you have any photos, bulletins, t-shirts, or other memorabilia from your Tab Rec days?

  8. Michael Whelan says:

    Had a chance to play Little League baseball back in 1950 when it was first started, I turned it down to play with the Wolverines in the Tabernacle league. All my buddies from St Joan of Arc School loved
    it

  9. DENNIS SOUTHERLAND says:

    I played on a 1963 or 1964 8th grade undefeated football team. Some of our teammates that went on to play college football, were:
    Steve Fickert, Noble York, Cliff Sellery, Scott Tegarden and me, Dennis Southerland. I would love to see a photograph of that team.

  10. Michael Lewis says:

    My brother Herb and I both played sports at TAB for several years in the late 50’s before we moved up to Suburban Chicago in the Spring of 1960. We played football, basketball – I won a “Most Improved Player Award” in basketball my last season there, which I though was a big deal at the time – and softball. My last year there, I was also on TAB’s “D League” team and we traveled around the city to play other teams. We still talk, laugh and tell stories about those wonderful years all the time.

    Our Dad – George Lewis – was a football star at Shortridge HS and Butler, and our Grandfather – Herbie Lewis – was the coach of the Indianapolis Capitals hockey team which had won the 1942-43 league championship (after winning the Stanley Cup with the Detroit Red Wings in ‘36 and ‘37 – he’s in the Hockey Hall of Fame) so TAB was the perfect place for our sports crazed family!

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