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Half of a stereoview of Fourth Presbyterian Church on East 9th Street, then named Pratt Street. Photographed by Charles S. Judd, Indianapolis, ca. 1875 (The Indiana Album: Loaned by Joan Hostetler)

Finding photographs of Indianapolis prior to the 1880s is challenging. Between 1839 and 1860, photography consisted mainly of one-of-a-kind photographic processes known as daguerreotypes, ambrotypes, and tintypes. These images were made on copper, glass, and sheet iron and most daguerreian artists or ambrotypists specialized in portraiture. Paper photography was popularized in the late 1850s and multiple prints could be made from the glass negatives. A few Indianapolis photographers made stereoviews of buildings and landscapes and they are highly prized today for the rare subject matter. Known local stereoview photographers include John Pendergast, William Salter, William H. Potter, and Charles S. Judd, who made this view of the Fourth Presbyterian Church shortly after its construction in 1873-74. Although the mounted image is not dated, the year is narrowed to the mid-1870s since Judd only worked in the city for a few short years.

Reverse of stereoview with handwritten identification. (The Indiana Album)

Reverse of stereoview with handwritten identification. (The Indiana Album)

Members of the Second Presbyterian Church organized the Fourth Presbyterian Church in 1851, constructing their first building on the southwest corner of Delaware and Market Streets. As members moved north, the congregation bought the residential property on the northwest corner of N. Pennsylvania and E. 9th (then Pratt) Streets from Ingram Fletcher, son of pioneer Calvin Fletcher. Fletcher requested that a memorial tablet be included in honor of his young son Newman Fletcher, who burned to death in a stable on the lot in 1870.  In June 1873 leaders accepted a plan submitted by architect Edwin May (who later designed the Indiana State House) to “erect a chapel on the back end of the lot, to front on Pratt street, and cost about $20,000.”  The main 90′ x 68′ room had a capacity for 300 people and was constructed in a circular shape. Fletcher’s stable and carriage house would remain and plans called for an addition at a later date. Work was to start immediately and to be “hurried through,” retaining existing trees and shrubs when possible and allowing for a fountain in the yard. The chapel was dedicated on 19 April 1874 and remained on this site until 1892 when the congregation moved north, yet again. In 1924, Fourth Presbyterian Church merged with Grace Presbyterian and was renamed the Fairview Presbyterian Church, still in existence today at 4609 N. Capitol Avenue.

The 1887 Sanborn Fire Insurance Map shows the brick church with a two-story wood frame house to the east. (IUPUI University Library)

The 1887 Sanborn Fire Insurance Map shows the brick church with a two-story wood frame house to the east. (IUPUI University Library)

By 1915 the church had been demolished and the Milton Apartments stood on the lot. The Plaza Apartments were built circa 1907. (IUPUI University Library)

By 1915 the church had been demolished and the Milton Apartments stood on the lot. The Plaza Apartments were built circa 1907. (IUPUI University Library)

View looking northwest on E. 9th Street at the former location of the Fourth Presbyterian Church (Google Street View, June 2011)

View looking northwest on E. 9th Street at the former location of the Fourth Presbyterian Church (Google Street View, June 2011)

The Milton Apartments were demolished between 1941 and 1956 and today the lot serves as parking for the restored Plaza Apartments.

The Fourth Presbyterian Church was located north of the current Central Library/Indianapolis Public Library. This map superimposes the current buildings on the 1887 Sanborn Fire Insurance Map. (MapIndy Brownfields Map)

The Fourth Presbyterian Church was located north of the current Central Library/Indianapolis Public Library in the historic St. Joseph Neighborhood. This map superimposes the current buildings onto the 1887 Sanborn Fire Insurance Map. (MapIndy Brownfields Map)

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Sources
Indianapolis Evening News,  15 April 1873, p. 1 and 30 June 1873, p. 1; Indiana Photographers Database compiled by Joan Hostetler; Sanborn Fire Insurance Maps, 1887, 1913, and 1956; Baist Fire Insurance Maps 1916, 1927, 1941; Indianapolis: A Historical and Statistic Sketch of the Railroad City, p. 211 (William Robeson Holloway, 1870); Greater Indianapolis: The History, the Industries, the Institutions, and the People of a City of Homes, p. 585 (Jacob Piatt Dunn, 1910); St. Joseph Historic Area Preservation Plan Building Inventory (Indianapolis Historic Preservation Commission, 1991/1994)

5 responses to “Indianapolis Then and Now: Fourth Presbyterian Church and The Milton Apartments, 26-30 E. 9th Street”

  1. Sharon Butsch Freeland says:

    Your article is a timely one! The annual Fairview Presbyterian Church’s Fish Fry occurs tonight and tomorrow night (June 6 and 7). Reportedly, the Fairview Fish Fry is the oldest continuously running fish fry in Marion County. It was started in 1934 to help pay for some repairs to the then ten-year-old church. These days, the proceeds go to Second Helpings, Gleaners Food Bank, Wheeler Mission, Habitat for Humanity, etc. The meal is an all-you-can-eat dinner that includes both fish and chicken.

  2. Tom Davis says:

    Sharon, don’t forget the great homemade desserts, as I can personally attest to having stopped there once when I just happened to be going by while on a bike ride.

  3. Sharon Butsch Freeland says:

    Thanks for pointing out the fact that the Fairview Fish Fry menu also includes fabulous desserts, although the sweets are not part of the all-you-can eat dinner price. Desserts are $1.00 to $2.50 extra. The all-you-can-eat dinners include two sides from the following options: cole slaw, tossed salad, baked beans, fries, and applesauce.

  4. Susan E Cullison says:

    Hello! Julius Fisher Pratt is my 2nd GGfather! It’s my understanding Pratt street was originally named after him and the had “mansion” on the 900 block of Pennysylvania St. Am very curious if there are any more pictures that may show this!!! He died in 1900 and was treasurer of Woodburn-Savern Wheel Co. Any information would be greatly appreciated!

  5. Tiffany Benedict Browne says:

    I’ve been doing some research on the Woodburn-Sarven Wheel works and am a little familiar with Julius Fisher Pratt. You might check the website http://www.whatwasthere.com to get a real sense of all the homes in that area. If you know the exact address, it is helpful, but keep in mind that many address numbers changed at least three times before settling on current numbers.

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