• Posted in: Vintage Flats Minturn Apartments, 22nd & Capitol

    The city is replete with buildings like this–loaded with potential,  sad and forlorn–a fading shadow of a former, glorious, incarnation. The namesake of this building is from its first owner, Joseph Allen Minturn (6/20/1861- 4/3/1943),...

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  • Posted in: Then & Now Then & Now: Independent Turnverein, 902 N. Meridian

    Postmarked 1917 Independent Turnverein Post Card, (courtesy HistoricIndianapolis.com) How lucky Indianapolis is that such detailed and well-crafted buildings still stand today–an unapologetic and ornate vestige of  yesteryear. This one, a magnificent red brick and limestone building...

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  • Posted in: At Your Leisure At Your Leisure: Last Train to Indy

    No passengers can be seen waiting in this 1970 photograph. (Image: Library of Congress) Passing the Romanesque Union Station may create conflicting emotions for some. It is gratifying to see an impressive historic building restored–especially...

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  • Posted in: Sunday Prayers Sunday Prayers: Horner-Terrill Home

    The Horner-Terrill home, located at the southwest corner of Emerson and Brookville, was built in 1875. It was vacant for nearly 20 years before homeowners Amanda and Eric Browning purchased the property in 2011. (photo...

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  • Posted in: Mailbag HI Mailbag: Mustard Family Properties in Washington Township

    Reader’s Question: Have you come across any information about Crown Hill Cemetery and the Mustard family?  My mother (age 92, with an excellent memory!) has always “recited” a family fact that, “Uncle Walter married the...

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  • Posted in: Sunday Prayers Sunday Prayers: Dear Katherine …

    Dear Katherine, I hope this letter finds you. It was difficult to track you down. In fact, it was practically impossible. The directories listed you as “Catherine”—with a ‘C’—so I can only assume that this...

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  • Posted in: Sunday Prayers Sunday Prayers: 131 N. Gladstone

    I’m in the heart of Tuxedo Park, trying to remember what “Indianapolis Architecture” told me. My copy of the book, which is split-right-down-the-middle, described the Tuxedo Park area as “a middle-class area, not too near...

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  • Posted in: Mailbag HI Mailbag: The Warren Apartments

    Reader’s Question: Can you tell me more about the early history of the Warren Apartments, what was there before the current building, and if anyone of note lived there?  ~ Jeffrey Congdon, Indianapolis HI’s Answer:...

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  • Posted in: Sunday Prayers Sunday Prayers: 619 E. New York St.

    Homeowner Krsana Henry was devastated when she first walked through 619 E. New York St. Only weeks before, she had inherited the Italianate-style home from her mother, Emma Jean (Gina) Rotstein. Rotstein, as it were,...

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  • Posted in: Mailbag HI Mailbag: Former Locations of Pike High School

    Reader’s Question: I live in Pike Township, and I have heard that the old Pike High School was located near 52nd and Lafayette Road.  There is a store that looks as though it’s built onto...

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  • Posted in: Vintage Flats Flats Saved: the L’Avon

    What’s your favorite flatiron building downtown? This apartment building is a potential contender–one of the oldest apartment buildings in Indianapolis. Six years after the Blacherne was constructed, the L’Avon was built in 1901 at 615...

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  • Posted in: Sunday Prayers Sunday Prayers: 430 N. Walcott

    (photo by Dawn Olsen) Lloyd D. Hammond was a working man. He was a travel agent for at least a decade, servicing the citizens of Indianapolis from the late 1800s through the 1910s. He was...

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  • Posted in: Building Language Building Language: Coping

    Coping. The architectural term coping refers to the top course of masonry used to “cap” the top of an exterior wall. Coping is commonly sloped or curved to help divert water away from the building....

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  • Posted in: Building Language Building Language: Steeple

    Steeple. The architectural term steeple refers to the entire tower and spire as found on religious architecture. The steeple will rise above the roofline of the building and can vary in height. The tower is...

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  • Posted in: WTH WTH Weds: Will the Real Historic Home Please Come Forward?

    Boarded windows notwithstanding, notice any other issues?...

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  • Posted in: Building Language Building Language: Brick Courses

    Brick Courses. Everyone has some understanding of brick as a building material. A wide range of building types, from small to large, residential to commercial, old and new, use brick as a primary structural or...

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  • Posted in: Building Language Building Language: Chimney

    Chimney. I highly doubt many of you are using today’s Building Language term – the chimney – in the midst of our July heat. Although buildings old and new feature chimneys, there’s still plenty to...

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  • Posted in: Building Language Building Language: Casement Windows

    Casement Windows.A casement window is a window opened on hinges either on its side, top, or bottom. Those casement windows with hinges on the top are known as awning windows, while those with hinges on...

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  • Posted in: Sunday Prayers Sunday Prayers: 10 North Delaware

    This sweet little brick commercial building at 10 North Delaware Street sorta breaks my heart. Clearly this is quite a vintage building, clearly it has ‘survived’ many a decade, clearly…not gracefully. Keep your eyes on...

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  • Posted in: Building Language Building Language: Cast Iron Façade

    East Washington Street at Southeastern Avenue, Cast Iron Storefronts Cast Iron Façade. The cast iron façade is common to late 19th century and early 20th century commercial, storefront architecture. Made of galvanized steel and cast...

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